The pamphlet, “Pentecost for England,” by the Rev. Alexander A. Boddy (1854-1930) in 1907 for distribution at the Keswick Convention of 1907. Writing only one year after the initial Pentecostal outpourings of Los Angeles and elsewhere, Boddy says that already 20,000 people have received the gift of speaking in tongues worldwide although only six of those people were in Great Britain. Later in the same year, 1907, Boddy hosted a Pentecostal revival at his church in Sunderland, with guest speaker T.B. Barrett, at which there was an outpouring of Pentecostal gifts.
A selection of articles from the 1922 issues of “Confidence” magazine that were authored by the Editor himself, the Rev. Alexander A. Boddy (1854-1930), who was the founder of Pentecostalism in the United Kingdom as well as Anglican vicar of All Saints’ Parish Church in Monkwearmouth, Sunderland, England, from 1884 to 1922. The Editor’s articles in 1922 include a personal testimony of his spiritual rebirth and a narration of an eventful September spent in London.


This book of Anglican doctrines and teachings written in 1895 is the work of Anglican vicar Rev. Alexander A. Boddy (1854-1930). The son of an Anglican rector, he was strongly influenced by Keswick teaching and studied theology at Durham. Ordained by Bishop J. B. Lightfoot, he became vicar at Elwick before being appointed as vicar at All Saints’ Parish Church, Sunderland at the early age of thirty-two, in 1884, remaining vicar there until 1922. Boddy is best known as a leading figure of the Pentecostal Movement in Britain shortly after the turn of the century.


Selected articles from the 1921 issues of “Confidence” magazine center on themes of Biblical prophecy and the Jewish return to the Palestine. This magazine was edited by the Rev. Alexander A. Boddy, an Anglican vicar who was the founder of Pentecostalism in the United Kingdom.


A selection of articles from the 192o issues of “Confidence” magazine that were authored by the Editor himself, the Rev. Alexander A. Boddy (1854-1930), who was the founder of Pentecostalism in the United Kingdom as well as Anglican vicar of All Saints’ Parish Church in Monkwearmouth, Sunderland, England, from 1884 to 1922. The Editor’s articles in the latter half of 1920 include a discussion of the centrality of Jesus Christ to Christian theology, a short narration of cycling through Welsh countryside, and articles about the Jewish return to Palestine in fulfillment of biblical prophecy.


The article, “On the Side of the Angels,” by the Rev. Alexander A. Boddy (1854-1930), the Editor of “Confidence” magazine, is excerpted here along with “Confidence” articles selected from the 1919 issues of the “Confidence” magazine, authored by the Editor as well as an editorial by his wife Mary and poem by daughter Jane.


Author’s Description: This Booklet is issued to emphasize the right “pleading” of the Precious Blood. The Writer cannot endorse any method which is not clearly Scriptural, or any method which is not (as far as we know) Apostolic. The Lord certainly looks at the heart, and in spite of unscriptural actions has met sanctified souls under strange conditions. But the Writer would dissuade all from rapidly repeating the word “Blood,” especially that word standing quite alone. We cannot be too reverent in speaking of “The precious Blood of Christ.” The true pleading of the Precious Blood of the Lord Jesus is not by swift repetition, but by reverent, adoring faith
A selection of articles from the 1920 issues of “Confidence” magazine that were authored by the Editor himself, the Rev. Alexander A. Boddy (1854-1930), who was the founder of Pentecostalism in the United Kingdom as well as Anglican vicar of All Saints’ Parish Church in Monkwearmouth, Sunderland, England, from 1884 to 1922. This edition features an article describing Boddy’s journey to Belgium in November 1919 and a commemoration of British soldiers fallen during World War I.
In these articles from the April-June 1923 issue, the Editor of “Confidence” magazine, Alexander A. Boddy, founder of the Pentecostal movement in the United Kingdom, describes his circumstances as the recently installed vicar at the Pittington Hallgarth church where he and his wife transferred in 1922, describing as an easing of his circumstances.. He talks about his enjoyment of country living after 38 years of service in Sunderland, a bustling industrial town on the shore of the North Sea.
The article, “From Sunderland to Pittington,” by the Rev. Alexander A. Boddy, excerpted from the January-March 1923 issue of “Confidence” magazine, is presented here along with related articles that accompanied the editor’s discussion of his farewell from All Saints’ Parish in Sunderland, England, after 38 years of ministry, and his transfer to the church in the village of Pittington, where he and his wife, of ailing health, were to live in semi-retirement until their deaths.
This pamphlet contains the personal testimony of the Rev. Alexander A. Boddy, the Anglican vicar of All Saints’ Parish Church, Sunderland, who is considered the founder of Pentecostalism in the United Kingdom. Boddy describes his first Pentecostal experience which occurred at the Sunderland church during revival meetings there and the events leading up to his personal experience, discussing the influence of the Welsh Revival and the revivals in Los Angeles. At Boddy’s invitation, T.B. Barratt traveled to Sunderland and spent seven weeks holding meetings at Boddy’s church. The result was a Pentecostal outpouring that laid the foundations of Pentecostalism in the United Kingdom.